Functional Fitness Challenge Video 2: Upper Body Push & Pull

Upper body push and pull mechanics are vital to our function in order to push or pull objects away from us or to us and to push or pull ourselves away from surfaces and objects or toward surfaces or objects. While real-life practical push and pull mechanics are often a-symmetrical or affected by awkward positioning and environment, it is good to know and practice ideal mechanics first.


Homework: Wednesday & Thursday 1-3 sets of 10


Push:

PushUp: 1 - 3 sets of 10 repetitions ・Find your surface ・Kitchen counter > Dining table > Coffee table > Floor w/ knees > Full plank/pushup position ・Feet together or hip width ・Shoulders, hips, & knees in-line ・LOOK NO LOWER THAN YOUR HANDS AND DO NOT LET HEAD DROP LOWER THAN CHEST ・Hands just wider than shoulders, at chest level ・Thumbs pointed at a 45 degree angle ・Lower chest and hips as one unit ・NO SHRUGGING


Pull: 1 - 3 sets of 10 repetitions of one pulling exercise - see options below


DB Bent Over Row ・Use your squat mechanics to squat down ・Feet shoulder width, toes pointed slightly outward ・Initiate with hips, pushing your butt back ・LOOK FORWARD, NOT DOWN ・Nose over toes, meaning if you hung a string from the tip of your nose it would fall in front of your toes. ・Hands at 10:00 & 2:00 ・Pull hands toward the sides of your chest ・Driving the elbows back and squeezing shoulder blades together


Band Mid Row: ・Feet shoulder width apart, knees bent in a slight squat ・Hands at 10:00 & 2:00 ・Pull hands toward the sides of your chest ・Driving the elbows back and squeezing shoulder blades together


TRX or Towel Mid Row: ・Feet shoulder width apart, knees bent in a slight squat ・Hands at 10:00 & 2:00 ・Walk feet forward and lean back so your straps/towel are holding you up ・Pull yourself toward your hands so your hands end up toward the sides of your chest ・Driving the elbows back and squeezing shoulder blades together


As before and always, listen to your body and work within your abilities. If you need to lighten up your resistance, do it. If you can only come down a few inches, then just come down a few inches. If you can do more, go for it! But no matter what...


REMEMBER: SLOOOOOOOOOOOOOW!!! Working slowly develops muscular coordination, balance, and endurance, all of which are keys to joint stabilization. Don't underestimate the importance of moving slowly!